You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MariaDB server version for the right syntax to use near '26,352,'','1618184595')' at line 1. Failed to access hit info.

Future Health






Cinnamon, Diabetes and the effects on blood sugar

March 16, 2021 

Anyone who has diabetes knows that maintaining a well-balanced diet is essential. For some people managing their diabetes is not easy, it’s a daily struggle they deal with. Who would have known that something as simple as cinnamon could help poorly controlled type 2 diabetes?

Cinnamon is a spice made from tree bark that is available in extracts, teas, and capsules. It is a safe choice for people with diabetes who want a less risky alternative to sugar, salt, and other flavoring agents. Studies suggest that just 3 to 6 grams of cinnamon consumed regularly showed a reduction in fasting blood sugar levels.

There are 2 types of cinnamon Ceylon and Cassia. Cassia cinnamon is usually found in food products and in the spice isle while Ceylon cinnamon is more expensive and is less common than Cassia cinnamon. Ceylon cinnamon contains more antioxidants.  Because it contains more antioxidants, it’s possible that Ceylon cinnamon may provide more health benefits.

Tips for consuming cinnamon safely and effectively include:

  • Keep a food log or self-care plan.
  • Stick to a diabetes care plan. Cinnamon is not a substitute for blood sugar monitoring, a healthful diet, or diabetes medications.
  • Use cinnamon in its whole form as a flavoring agent for healthful foods, such as oatmeal and muesli. People should avoid eating cinnamon rolls, sticky buns, or other sugary foods that are rich in cinnamon or cinnamon flavoring.

Cinnamon may be useful for managing blood sugar in some people but is not a reliable alternative to traditional diabetes treatments. Do your research and speak to a doctor before trying any new treatments for diabetes, including cinnamon and other herbal remedies. These might interact with existing medications or have unexpected effects on blood sugar.